Vodka and The Gypsy Queen

Although its history is over 600 years old, one of the earliest examples of the inclusion of Vodka in a cocktail was recently rediscovered by Imbibe! author David Wondrich. According to him, the published recipe for the Gypsy (a.k.a: Vodka Queen) first hit shelves in the mid-1930s. While Vodka had not yet been embraced by the American public, it would become the best-selling spirit in The United States by 1955 amidst the tension of the Cold War. Vodka received its reputation as the spirit most associated with the artificially flavored, neon-colored cocktails of the 80’s and 90’s. All but dismissed by contemporary craft bartenders, it has only recently begun to again find its place behind the bar. If you’re still on the fence about Vodka, give The Gypsy Queen a try. We think it might change your mind. Cheers!

 

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